A higher deductible means lower premiums, your monthly or annual price. But if you get in an accident, you will have to pay more than if your deductibles were lower. For example, if you have a $500 deductible on a $2,000 accident, you’d pay $500 before your insurance company covers the other $1,500. With a $1,000 deductible, you’re paying $1,000 and your insurer covers the remaining $1,000.
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Analysis used a consistent base profile for the insured driver: a 30-year-old single male driving a 2013 Honda Accord EX with a good driving history and coverage limits of $50,000 bodily injury liability per person/$100,000 bodily injury liability per accident/$50,000 property damage liability per accident with a $500 deductible for comprehensive and collision. For coverage level data, optional coverage (that must be rejected in writing) is included where applicable, including uninsured motorist coverage and personal injury protection.
The hardest part is finding out which auto insurance company will give you the most value for your money while providing the reliable coverage you need as a driver. You’ll never know if you’re getting cheap car insurance unless you compare it with other major insurance companies. To avoid overpaying for your current coverage, start comparing quotes today at Compare.com.
NerdWallet averaged rates for 30-year-old men and women for 10 ZIP codes in each state and Washington, D.C., from the largest insurers in each state. “Good drivers” had no moving violations on record and credit in the “good” tier as reported to each insurer. For the other two driver profiles, we changed the credit tier to “poor” or added one at-fault accident, keeping everything else the same. Sample drivers had the following coverage limits:
Collision and comprehensive only cover the market value of your car, not what you paid for it—and new cars depreciate quickly. If your car is totaled or stolen, there may be a “gap” between what you owe on the vehicle and your insurance coverage. To cover this, you may want to look into purchasing gap insurance to pay the difference. Note that for leased vehicles, gap coverage is usually rolled into your lease payments.
In aggregate, our three most expensive cities in North Carolina ranked with a cost of car insurance that was 17% greater than the state mean. The average annual premium for these three cities was $946, which, while expensive relatively speaking in the state, actually fell on the cheaper side compared to other states the team has analyzed. These locations ranged vastly in size from populations of less than 5,000 to over 203,000.
You may have heard that men pay more than women for car insurance. This is true, because statistically men are more likely to engage in risky driving practices like speeding and driving under the influence, which results in more accidents. Massachusetts, Hawaii, and North Carolina do not allow gender to play a role in auto insurance rates, so drivers in those states don’t have to worry.

Plus, there are hundreds of car insurance companies. What are the chances that the one company you selected is the cheapest car insurance for you? Unless you are comparing prices, you won’t know how much you could be saving. In one comparison, a woman in Texas got prices that ranged from $77 a month to $300. That’s over $2,600 in savings every year from switching car insurance companies.
That’s also hard to say. Beyond how much coverage you’re looking to buy, the cost of car insurance is affected by driving record, place of residence, type of car, how much you drive and your personal details (age, gender, marital status, etc.) But just so you have a frame of reference for what types of prices to expect, the average annual cost for car insurance was about $900 back in 2014.
Step 6: Make your choice. Now that you have weighed your choices, make your purchase. Be sure that you make all the choices that you made when you ran your quote. Make sure that there is nothing you have to do at the onset of your policy that will matter later on in your policy life, such as signing up for a safe driving tool that would give you a discount at a later date. Remember, your unique situation will determine which company is best for you.
When your life changes, your insurance needs may change as well. Life events like a change of residence or a new driver on your policy are a few of the things that can make your insurance premiums rise. That's why we offer members a free On Your Side® Review every year to make sure your insurance is keeping up with your life. We also want to make sure you’re taking advantage of the many benefits we offer, including discounts.

Ehhhh ... I mean, you won't face a legal penalty. (They vary by state, but usually involve hefty fines. Plus, your license could get suspended.) In terms of adequate coverage, it depends on where you live. Some states have low minimums. In fact, many only require liability insurance, which covers property damage or bodily injury you cause other people. You would need other types of car insurance if you wanted coverage for damage to your car.

The price of car insurance can vary greatly between states. One company may be expensive in Utah, but inexpensive in New York. In some states, a small, local company could even offer the best price. Below, click through to your state to see which company and cities have the least expensive car insurance based on the numerous studies we've conducted.

No, you just have to get proactive. You can call your agent to see if you qualify for a lower rate or you can shop around for a new policy. In fact, car insurance rates fluctuate so often and so widely that, no matter how you feel about your policy, it's a good idea to at least window-shop every one to three years. You can also ask your insurer if you qualify for any discounts.


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