The Texas health insurance market has turned shopping for affordable health insurance quotes in Texas into a maze. Although there is no single “best” plan, there are some Texas health plans that will be better than others for you and your family’s health care needs. Plans differ, both in price and in access to service. To ensure you make the right decision in choosing an affordable health insurance plan in Texas for you and your family, contact Custom Health Plans. A Texas health insurance agent will be able to provide personalized attention and a health insurance quote in Texas to find the perfect plan for you.

The changes to group health insurance in Texas incorporated with the Affordable Care Act opened up new avenues for offering added value to your employees, but the process can be confusing at best. But it doesn’t have to be a struggle to find small business health insurance in Texas. A Custom Health Plans specialist will analyze your specific company’s needs and find the best Texas small business health insurance plan on the market for you and your employees, ensuring your company saves money, and your employees are covered.
Public health insurance is provided or subsidized in some way by the federal government. Medicare, Veteran benefits, and insurance provided to federal employees are all examples of public health insurance. Private health insurance, on the other hand, is provided by private companies. The CDC estimated that in 2017, 65 percent of Americans under age 65 were covered by private insurance.
A good place to start is HealthCare.gov. This is the health insurance exchange created by the The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, and is a one-stop shop for private individual market health insurance plans (note that the exchange itself is run by the government, but the health plans for sale in the exchange are all private, from the health insurance companies with which you're already familiar). People in 39 states use HealthCare.gov to enroll in individual market plans. The other 11 states and the District of Columbia have state-run exchanges, and you'll be directed to their sites from HealthCare.gov when you select your state.
There are other plans available year-round that are not individual major medical coverage. Most of these plans are not recommended as stand-alone coverage (with the exception of short-term plans, which can be adequate stand-alone coverage if you're healthy and you know that you need the coverage for only a short time; they are usually not at all adequate for longer-term coverage). These plans are not regulated by the Affordable Care Act, which means they can exclude pre-existing conditions, impose dollar caps on your coverage, and don't have to cover the ACA's essential health benefits. In most cases, these plans cannot really be compared with an employer-sponsored plan, since the coverage will be so much lower quality. If an insurance offer sounds too good to be true, read the fine print carefully. It may end up being a poor substitute for real health insurance, and you don't want to learn those details after you have a major claim.
Nearly a century later, private health insurance continues to dominate the U.S. health care landscape. Despite attempts by U.S. Presidents, including Harry S. Truman, John F. Kennedy and Bill Clinton, government-sponsored universal health care never materialized. And, although President Lyndon Johnson signed Medicare into law in the 1960s to provide a safety net for citizens over age 65, the majority of Americans under 65 continue to get their health care from private insurers.

How do the benefits differ? What would you owe in out-of-pocket costs if you were to be injured or get seriously ill? How does that compare with your out-of-pocket exposure on the employer-sponsored plan? Are your doctors in the network of the individual plan? You'll want to carefully consider all of these things before switching, and keep in mind that you won't be able to rejoin your employer's plan until the next open enrollment window offered by your employer.
A good place to start is HealthCare.gov. This is the health insurance exchange created by the The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, and is a one-stop shop for private individual market health insurance plans (note that the exchange itself is run by the government, but the health plans for sale in the exchange are all private, from the health insurance companies with which you're already familiar). People in 39 states use HealthCare.gov to enroll in individual market plans. The other 11 states and the District of Columbia have state-run exchanges, and you'll be directed to their sites from HealthCare.gov when you select your state.

Depending on the health insurance company, Texas individual and family health insurance rates for couples can be based on the age of the youngest person on the policy. Some couples with an age difference of several years may find they save money by applying for the same plan rather than individually. Couples that are only a few years apart might be able to reduce their total costs by applying for separate health insurance plans. If you decide to apply for a health insurance plan as a couple, make sure the plan you choose covers the benefits both of you need.


Gathering health insurance quotes from multiple companies can be a daunting process. However, if you’re looking for affordable health insurance options in Texas, it is a necessity. We take great pride in providing information on a number of insurance policies from the best companies so you can make the most informed decision possible from a variety of health insurance quotes. We can complete these quotes much faster than you could on your own. We also make it as easy as possible to compare the plans so you can fairly compare the benefits to each and choose the one that best suits your needs.
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