These plans meet all the requirements of the health care law, including covering pre-existing conditions, providing free preventive care, and not capping annual benefits. If you have one of these plans, you won’t have to pay the fee that people without coverage must pay through the 2018 plan year. (Note: Starting with the 2019 plan year (for which you’ll file taxes in April 2020), the fee no longer applies.)
A good place to start is HealthCare.gov. This is the health insurance exchange created by the The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, and is a one-stop shop for private individual market health insurance plans (note that the exchange itself is run by the government, but the health plans for sale in the exchange are all private, from the health insurance companies with which you're already familiar). People in 39 states use HealthCare.gov to enroll in individual market plans. The other 11 states and the District of Columbia have state-run exchanges, and you'll be directed to their sites from HealthCare.gov when you select your state.

Attention: This website is operated by HealthMarkets Insurance Agency and is not the Health Insurance Marketplace website. In offering this website, HealthMarkets Insurance Agency is required to comply with all applicable federal laws, including the standards established under 45 CFR 155.220(c) and (d) and standards established under 45 CFR 155.260 to protect the privacy and security of personally identifiable information. This website may not display all data on Qualified Health Plans being offered in your state through the Health Insurance Marketplace website. To see all available data on Qualified Health Plan options in your state, go to the Health Insurance Marketplace website at HealthCare.gov.
The Affordable Care Act (ACA) is intended to ensure that Americans have access to healthcare they can afford. To that end, it has created a public marketplace where people can buy health insurance. Depending on life circumstances and income, this public marketplace provides insurance plans with tax credits that lower premiums to make the plans more accessible to many Americans. If you’re interested in learning more information about the public marketplace, we can help you evaluate the options.
​​​Medi-Cal is California's Medicaid program. This is a public health insurance program which provides needed health care services for low-income individuals including families with children, seniors, persons with disabilities, foster care, pregnant women, and low income people with specific diseases such as tuberculosis, breast cancer, or HIV/AIDS.  Medi-Cal is financed equally by the state and federal government. ​​​​​
There are other online brokerages, both large and small, that can help you sort out the individual market health insurance options available in your area. Most of them can show you plans that are available in the exchange as well as options that are only available outside the exchange (no subsidies are available outside the exchange, but as noted above, you're probably not eligible for subsidies anyway, if you have access to an employer-sponsored plan).
Baylor Hospital, in Dallas, Texas, introduced the first pre-paid hospital insurance in 1929, offering to provide medical services to a group of Texas teachers for a premium of 50 cents a month. The plan worked on the principle of paying for the costs of care for a small group of sick individuals by spreading them out over a much larger pool. The concept caught on, and by the late 1930s, nearly 3 million Americans were enrolled in “Blue Cross” hospital plans.

However, they might still be able to find a less expensive plan in the individual/family market, even paying full price for the premiums. It would almost certainly have a higher deductible and out-of-pocket exposure than the plan Doug's employer offers, but that might be a trade-off that the family considers worthwhile. Doug might find that his employer-sponsored coverage for just himself is very affordable, since employers often pay more towards the employee's premiums than they pay towards additional family members' premiums. So Doug's family might opt to keep Doug on the employer-sponsored plan and get an individual market plan for his wife and kids.

There are other plans available year-round that are not individual major medical coverage. Most of these plans are not recommended as stand-alone coverage (with the exception of short-term plans, which can be adequate stand-alone coverage if you're healthy and you know that you need the coverage for only a short time; they are usually not at all adequate for longer-term coverage). These plans are not regulated by the Affordable Care Act, which means they can exclude pre-existing conditions, impose dollar caps on your coverage, and don't have to cover the ACA's essential health benefits. In most cases, these plans cannot really be compared with an employer-sponsored plan, since the coverage will be so much lower quality. If an insurance offer sounds too good to be true, read the fine print carefully. It may end up being a poor substitute for real health insurance, and you don't want to learn those details after you have a major claim.
We understand how frustrating it can be to find affordable health insurance in Texas that maintains the level of coverage you need. This is why we treat each of our clients with the respect and personalized service you expect. We will provide custom health insurance quotes so you can choose the low cost health insurance necessary to give your family the peace of mind in being able to see the doctor whenever you or a family member needs it without worrying about how you will afford it.
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