Auto insurance isn’t only great protection for your vehicle, it’s also the law. All states require some degree of insurance for your vehicle to protect you and other motorists. Coverage requirements will vary based on your financial responsibility for your car and your state’s requirements. Some states even require you to have liability insurance before you even get a license.
It’s simple: If you drive a car, you need car insurance. Almost every state in the U.S. requires that drivers have at least basic liability coverage. You should also consider additional coverages, such as uninsured motorist coverage, collision coverage, personal injury protection and comprehensive car insurance to make sure you’re always prepared for the unexpected.
For instance, a moving violation affects your driving record for three years in most states. Once you know it has been three years since your ticket, there’s no need to wait for your current auto policy to expire. You can immediately quote a new policy that will no longer charge you for that violation. The same goes for an at-fault accident, which will typically affect your rate for three to five years (but can vary by state and carrier). In addition, Progressive offers discounts for being ticket- and accident-free.
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Car insurance is required in every state (and Washington DC) with three exceptions: New Hampshire, Missouri (uninsured drivers must submit “proof of financial responsibility” to the Department of Revenue), and Virginia (where drivers must pay a $500 fee to drive uninsured). These states still require at-fault drivers to pay for any bodily injury and property damage.


Below is a table with the three companies with the lowest auto insurance rates for ten of the biggest cities in the state. This will help motorists see a local view of who has the cheapest rates in their hometown. However, these rates are for our single male sample driver, so it is important to remember that your rates will differ based on your vehicle, driving record, and other factors. Auto-Owners, Allied, and North Carolina Farm Bureau dominated as the top three cheapest car insurance companies across the 112 cities we surveyed.
We don't pretend to be cutting-edge; we actually provide fast, simple ways for you to personalize an auto policy with our own CoverageMyWay®, which helps you make smart choices with protection. And, of course, we don't make vague promises about affordable North Carolina auto insurance; we bring an array of discounts tastier than a hickory-smoked hog. Grab a North Carolina car insurance quote and find out what it's like to have coverage that doesn't just seem like the real deal — but actually is.

A higher deductible means lower premiums, your monthly or annual price. But if you get in an accident, you will have to pay more than if your deductibles were lower. For example, if you have a $500 deductible on a $2,000 accident, you’d pay $500 before your insurance company covers the other $1,500. With a $1,000 deductible, you’re paying $1,000 and your insurer covers the remaining $1,000.
Since most people choose one of these large insurers, NerdWallet compared quotes from the five largest auto companies in ZIP codes across the country. Rates are for policies that include minimum coverage required in each state, plus collision and comprehensive coverage. Our “good driver” profile is a 30-year-old with no moving violations and credit in the “good” tier. Use the tabs to see rates for drivers with credit in the “poor” tier and those with one at-fault accident as reported to the insurer.
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