How do the benefits differ? What would you owe in out-of-pocket costs if you were to be injured or get seriously ill? How does that compare with your out-of-pocket exposure on the employer-sponsored plan? Are your doctors in the network of the individual plan? You'll want to carefully consider all of these things before switching, and keep in mind that you won't be able to rejoin your employer's plan until the next open enrollment window offered by your employer.
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If the coverage available through your employer feels unaffordable, you can shop around online to see what's available. You may be able to find an individual market policy that will provide you with the coverage you need but is less expensive than the premium you pay at work. This is unlikely to be the case if your plan only covers yourself, since your employer is likely subsidizing a good chunk of the total premiums for the plan offered through your job. But some employer-sponsored plans require the employee to cover the full cost of adding family members, so it's possible that your family members could get a better deal with a separate policy.
As mentioned above, the majority of Americans who have insurance obtain it through employer-sponsored, or group health insurance plans. The coverage has numerous advantages – among them cost (including the government income tax exemption for health benefits), ease of enrollment, and a wide range of plan options. (In addition to a health insurance plan, employees may have the option to purchase insurance for dental, life, short- and long-term disability.) Read here for more details about group health insurance plans.
According to a Kaiser Family Foundation analysis, in 2018, the average American worker with employer-sponsored health insurance contributed $1,186 for a single employee health plan and $5,547 for a family health plan. Since this is an average, some employees may be paying much more (employers paid the bulk of the total premiums, which averaged $6,896 for single employees and $19,616 for family coverage).
No individual applying for health coverage through the individual marketplace will be discouraged from applying for benefits, turned down for coverage or charged more premium because of health status, medical condition, mental illness claims experience, medical history, genetic information or health disability. In addition, no individual will be denied coverage based on race, color, religion, national origin, sex, sexual orientation, marital status, personal appearance, political affiliation or source of income.
The changes to group health insurance in Texas incorporated with the Affordable Care Act opened up new avenues for offering added value to your employees, but the process can be confusing at best. But it doesn’t have to be a struggle to find small business health insurance in Texas. A Custom Health Plans specialist will analyze your specific company’s needs and find the best Texas small business health insurance plan on the market for you and your employees, ensuring your company saves money, and your employees are covered.
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