Besides being legally required in almost every state, auto insurance is an incredibly important part of your financial safety net. The average car insurance claim in 2013 was over $15,000 for bodily injury and over $3,200 for property damage. Car insurance is there to cover medical bills, vehicle repair or replacement, and keeps you off the hook for injury and damage liability for others. Your premiums will go up if you cause an accident, but that’s better than the alternative.

We have compiled all the car insurance requirements on a state-by-state basis so you can see at a glance what the minimum coverage is―and what other regulations you may need to comply with in your home state. This information can be especially useful when you are new to a state, or if you are a newly licensed driver. Choose your state below for car insurance requirements in your neck of the woods.


Also known as AARP, The Hartford was the recipient of the 2016 J.D. Power study for car insurance companies ability to handle claims. The Hartford scored 5/5 stars for nearly every step of the claims process; from notifying them, to the repair process, and the final settlement. Those who think a smooth claims process is the most important factor for car insurance, The Hartford should definitely be considered.
Florida - Learn more on Florida Department of Financial Services & Florida Office of Insurance Regulation Websites! Whether you live in Miami, Fort Lauderdale, Orlando, Tampa, Jacksonville or any other FL city, you'll find all the help you need over here: Consumer Services, Licensee Search, Division of Insurance: Agent & Agency Services, Florida Office of Insurance Regulation, FLOIR: Consumer Resources, Florida's Insurance Consumer Advocate
While this varies from insurer to insurer, generally a learner driver will be covered by a car insurance policy as long as there is an instructing passenger in the front seat who is a fully licensed regular driver. In most cases, you don’t have to pay an additional premium but if the learner driver has an accident, you might have to pay an age or inexperience deductible or both. Of course, they must abide by the terms and conditions of the policy as well. If you drive while pregnant, it won’t affect your policy unless you’ve been advised to refrain from driving or that your pregnancy could negatively affect your capacity to drive. To ensure you are fully able to drive, it is a good idea to consult your doctor.
In today's economy, we know money can be tight. At Nationwide, you can choose whether you want to pay monthly, quarterly or semi-annually. You also can choose to pay by check, debit or credit card, through the mail, online or over the phone. We also offer paperless billing, which allows you to save money on postage by scheduling recurring automatic payments and may qualify you for our one-time Easy Pay sign-up discount.
Insurance companies place a lot of weight on your credit score as they see it as a highly accurate way to determine risk. Studies by the Federal Trade Commission have shown that drivers with low credit scores not only file more claims than drivers with higher credit scores, but the actual dollar amount is greater than higher scoring drivers. Thus, they’re cheaper clients. On average, moving from one credit tier to the next among our selected insurers saves you an average of $344 a year.
Need help selecting the right car insurance coverage? You can chat online with one of our friendly professionals while you get your quote! Care for a more personal touch? Call 1­-800-­INFINITY and get the same friendly service over the phone! And don’t worry, we don’t outsource our customer service, so you will always be speaking with someone who works for Infinity and can answer all of your questions.
Step 3: Review what you found. If you are able, print out the different quotes you obtained. Make sure all the information is accurate and comparable. See if there are any differences with added no-cost features. These may be the ultimate thing that you base your decision on. Also, check on the policy exclusions (items that are not covered under the policy).
Insurance comparison websites can be further broken down into sites that provide real-time insurance quotes versus those that provide estimated ones. Estimated quotes are derived from historic data and are often out of date; to get the most accurate information you should use a site that provides real-time quotes generated by the insurance companies.
After our analysis of 2,700 cities and 128 companies, we found that Erie was the most affordable major insurer in the country with an average yearly rate of $1,052 based on our sample driver - about 31% cheaper than the national average across every insurer. The very largest of the five is GEICO, the second largest auto insurer in the U.S. by market share.
Young drivers (those between the ages of 16 and 25) pay extraordinarily high auto insurance rates, with those aged 16-19 paying the most expensive premiums of all. Because of the risk presented by inexperienced drivers, teens pay more than three times the national average for car insurance. In Virginia, the average teen driver pays $3,747 — approximately $1,200 less than the national teen driver average, but more than three times as much as an older driver in Virginia.
There are two other methods that come immediately to mind. First, you could pay your premiums annually or semi-annually. Some car insurers offer anywhere from a 3% to 10% discount for doing so. The other thing you can consider is increasing your deductible. That's the amount of money you pay out of pocket before insurance kicks in, so you'd pay more in case of an accident, but your monthly premium would be lower.
Example (Comprehensive): You park your car outside during a major hailstorm, and it's totaled. If you have comprehensive, we'll pay out for the full value of your car (minus your deductible amount). Example (Collision): You back out of your garage, hit your basketball hoop, and cause $2,000 worth of damage to your vehicle. If you have collision, we'll then pay for your repairs (minus your deductible amount).
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