Most insurers — and we're not just talking about auto insurance companies here — use some type of credit-based insurance score to help determine how risky a potential customer is. The practice is a bit controversial, which is why some states have laws against using it (see above). But the general thinking behind insurer credit checks is: If someone is bad with their finances, they might be irresponsible in other areas of life, too. You can learn more about how car insurance rates are determined here.
DMV.org is a privately-owned site that helps drivers interact with their local Department of Motor Vehicles. This site is not an official government agency, but acts as a middleman between you and your local DMV; for example, a visitor may renew their vehicle registration or driver’s license on the site for an additional fee. The website is rated 4 out of 5, and has 5,830 user reviews on Trustpilot.
Besides being legally required in almost every state, auto insurance is an incredibly important part of your financial safety net. The average car insurance claim in 2013 was over $15,000 for bodily injury and over $3,200 for property damage. Car insurance is there to cover medical bills, vehicle repair or replacement, and keeps you off the hook for injury and damage liability for others. Your premiums will go up if you cause an accident, but that’s better than the alternative.
Part of why car insurance quotes are so confusing is because car insurance itself is confusing. For starters, there are different types of coverage. Some are required by law; some are not. And the specifics vary by state. We’ve got a full explainer on how car insurance works right here. But, since it’s so crucial to understanding your quotes, here’s an overview of the major components of an auto insurance policy — and what they cover.
Property and casualty insurance provided by United Services Automobile Association, USAA Casualty Insurance Company, USAA General Indemnity Company, Garrison Property and Casualty Insurance Company, based in San Antonio, TX; USAA Limited (UK) and USAA S.A. (Europe) and is available only to persons eligible for P&C group membership. Each company has sole financial responsibility for its own products.
Results: Nerdwallet returned three quotes ranging from $154 per month to $315 per month and six “estimated rates” ranging from $153 per month to $330 per month, from mostly name-brand insurance carriers. Each quote/rate included a little information about the company, a company rating, and a summary of Nerdwallet’s review (accessed by clicking on the “view details” link). The quotes had a button to click in order to buy the policy over the phone, but only one quote offering the option to purchase online. The estimated rates included a button to click to access the company’s website and get an actual quote from them.
Also known as AARP, The Hartford was the recipient of the 2016 J.D. Power study for car insurance companies ability to handle claims. The Hartford scored 5/5 stars for nearly every step of the claims process; from notifying them, to the repair process, and the final settlement. Those who think a smooth claims process is the most important factor for car insurance, The Hartford should definitely be considered.
Every auto insurance company advertises its low rates. But as with any product, the cheapest car insurance policy isn't always the best option. Considering the financial stakes, it's worth doing the due diligence to find a policy that protects your car completely in the event of a collision. Hunt for a great value, instead of settling for the cheapest car insurance in your state.

Between September and December 2017, The Zebra conducted comprehensive auto insurance pricing analysis using its proprietary quote engine, comprising data from insurance rating platforms and public rate filings. The Zebra examined nearly 53 million rates to explore trends for specific auto insurance rating factors across all United States zip codes, averaged by state, including Washington, DC.

Asheville takes the top spot on our list of the cheapest auto insurance rates in North Carolina with an average annual rate of $725, which make it 10% more affordable than the rest of the state. We suggest drivers in Asheville consider obtaining quotes from Auto Owners, North Carolina Farm Bureau, Penn National, Titan, and Erie. As our top five most affordable companies near you, we found their average annual rate to be $622, a 14% reduction from the city wide average. Keep in mind North Carolina Farm Bureau requires a $25 membership fee and is open to people of non-farming professions as well. Numbering over 83,000 in residents, Asheville is home to the largest private residence in America, the Biltmore Estate, as well as the United States National Climatic Data Center, the world’s largest active archive of weather data. It has garnered recognition for an assortment of titles from “Beer City USA” to “Happiest City for Women”, to which we add the "Best City in North Carolina for Auto Insurance"!


As you probably already know, a simple Google search blasts out a vast variety of insurance companies. Advertisements on television all promise savings. Their gimmicks attempt to grab your attention and win your business, which, all too often, can leave you confused. Have you ever ended up selecting the company you feel is most truthful in their advertising and try to get it over with quickly?
If you have very poor credit, the cheapest car insurance company is Farmers, where your premium will be more than $600 lower than the group average. Still, if you compare to the highest credit level you can see you can see how impactful your premium is if your credit is poor. Compared to the "great" credit tier, there's a difference of nearly $1,400 per year. Just another reason to keep your score up!
Although it’s not hugely impactful, drivers with a Masters or Ph.D. save $44 per year on car insurance premiums, compared to those without a degree. Car insurance companies see clients with higher education levels as less risky and reward that decreased risk with a lower premium. The only states that do not consider education when determining rates are California, Massachusetts, Georgia, Hawaii, and Montana.

OpenSecrets.org: OpenSecrets is the website of the Center for Responsive Politics, a nonprofit, nonpartisan research group located in Washington DC. It's the top resource in the US for unbiased information and allows users to track federal campaign contributions and lobbying by lobbying firms, individual lobbyists, industry, federal agency and bills. Other resources include the personal financial disclosures of all members of the US congress, the president and top members of the administration. OpenSecrets users can also search through ZIP codes to learn how their neighbours are allocating their political contributions.

All of these together determine the Insuranks Score of every insurance service provider on the site, a score that is being served to you, insurance shoppers, all over the platform - whether it's when you receive your quotes from the marketplace, when you browse through the top 10 insurers/producers rankings, when you simply browse through insurance service providers around the site and whenever you communicate, interact and engage with any insurance service provider on the website - to simply make your insurance experience absolutely ASTONISHING, SIMPLE & POSITIVE!


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