Fayetteville is our #1 Most Expensive City in North Carolina, with an average annual cost of $977 when it comes to insuring an automobile - that's 21% more for our sample drivers than the typical NC city. Fayetteville is a fast-growing city with a population of over 203,000 residents, which makes it the sixth largest city in North Carolina. It was almost the capital of North Carolina (lost by one vote!), and was named after the Marquis de Lafayette when he visited in 1825. The Marquis toured the 24 state union in a carriage, which can be found in the Fayetteville Independent Light Infantry Amory & Museum. We suggest Fayetteville drivers save on auto insurance by looking into Auto Owners, Allied, North Carolina Farm Bureau, Erie, and Penn National. We found rates across these five companies to be $792 near you, which is 21% less than what drivers across Fayetteville usually pay. One thing to remember is that North Carolina Farm Bureau has a $25 membership fee but its low rates on auto insurance make joining worthwhile.
Results: After working my way through the DMV.org quoting process, I discovered that they don’t actually provide car insurance quotes. Instead, they just provide you with links to other websites where you can get a quote. In my case, it gave me exactly two links: to Esurance and Allstate. Clicking a link to go to one of these websites required me to start all over with the quoting process, leaving me wondering why I’d bothered with DMV.org in the first place.

Results: After a short wait, the quoting tool produced two quotes, for $299 per month and $971 per month, plus links to two other insurance sites. SmartFinancial allows you to narrow down the results further by selecting desired features such as local agents and low down payment, but given how limited the results were in the first place, that particular option isn’t much help.


Step 1: Gather your information. To obtain a quote you will need birth dates, an email address, and a previous address in most cases. Also, know what type of car you are driving. This is more than make and model. Know what trim package you have, etc. These little things do matter. If you are currently insured, having your policy handy is not a bad idea.

MetLife Auto & Home is a brand of Metropolitan Property and Casualty Insurance Company and its affiliates: Economy Preferred Insurance Company, Metropolitan Casualty Insurance Company, Metropolitan Direct Property and Casualty Insurance Company (CA Certificate of Authority: 6730; Warwick, RI), Metropolitan General Insurance Company, Metropolitan Group Property and Casualty Insurance Company (CA COA: 6393; Warwick, RI), and Metropolitan Lloyds Insurance Company of Texas, all with administrative home offices in Warwick, RI. Coverage, rates, and discounts are available in most states to those who qualify.
Source: Insure.com, from a study commissioned by Insure.com from Quadrant Information Services. Averages are based on a 40-year-old male driver who commutes 12 miles to work, with policy limits of 100/300/50 ($100,000 for injury liability for one person, $300,000 for all injuries and $50,000 for property damage in an accident) and a $500 deductible on collision and comprehensive insurance. The policy includes uninsured-motorist coverage. Rates were averaged across multiple ZIP codes and insurance companies. Average rates are for comparative purposes; your rate will depend on your personal factors.
Results: The final page offered five quotes ranging from $141 per month to $215 per month, and three links to other websites that I could use to get additional quotes. Unlike the other comparison websites, the quotes weren’t in any order (the others sorted their results from smallest to largest). Each quote included a company rating, policy features and a button that would either take you to the company’s website or allow you to compare it with another company. A list of options on the left side of the page allowed me to check off the features that I wanted to include, and eliminated companies not offering those features.

Part of why car insurance quotes are so confusing is because car insurance itself is confusing. For starters, there are different types of coverage. Some are required by law; some are not. And the specifics vary by state. We’ve got a full explainer on how car insurance works right here. But, since it’s so crucial to understanding your quotes, here’s an overview of the major components of an auto insurance policy — and what they cover.
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Is there a way to get one auto insurance quote comparison to find the best auto insurance policy for you? Do you go with the cheap auto insurance policy or more complete coverage? Let netQuote help you choose your insurance by comparing insurance quotes. There are more options than just accepting the state minimum guidelines. In fact, car insurance is a risk mitigation policy. Say as a salesperson you drive a thousand miles a week; the chances of you being in a fender bender are greater annually. Selecting the right car insurance will keep you out of harm’s way when it comes to legality.
Car insurance is required in every state (and Washington DC) with three exceptions: New Hampshire, Missouri (uninsured drivers must submit “proof of financial responsibility” to the Department of Revenue), and Virginia (where drivers must pay a $500 fee to drive uninsured). These states still require at-fault drivers to pay for any bodily injury and property damage.
NerdWallet averaged rates for 30-year-old men and women for 10 ZIP codes in each state and Washington, D.C., from the largest insurers in each state. “Good drivers” had no moving violations on record and credit in the “good” tier as reported to each insurer. For the other two driver profiles, we changed the credit tier to “poor” or added one at-fault accident, keeping everything else the same. Sample drivers had the following coverage limits:
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