Analysis used a consistent base profile for the insured driver: a 30-year-old single male driving a 2013 Honda Accord EX with a good driving history and coverage limits of $50,000 bodily injury liability per person/$100,000 bodily injury liability per accident/$50,000 property damage liability per accident with a $500 deductible for comprehensive and collision. For coverage level data, optional coverage (that must be rejected in writing) is included where applicable, including uninsured motorist coverage and personal injury protection.
If you opt for the minimum required coverage in Virginia, prepare to pay an average of $385 annually. This is more affordable than the U.S. average by 41%. If you opt for better coverage, you can select a policy with comprehensive and collision coverage, protecting against costs incurred by car collisions, theft and vandalism, or weather incidents. It's worth noting that better coverage has a price: in Virginia, a comprehensive policy with a $1,000 deductible costs $792, 105% more than liability-only coverage. For a comprehensive policy with a $500 deductible, expect to pay 135% more than you would for a basic liability-only policy.
New York - New Yorkers get all of the information they need on NY's Department of Financial Services website insurance industry section. Whether you are from New York City - Manhattan, Queens, Brooklyn, The Bronx, Staten Island or any other NYC location, Buffalo, Rochester or any other city within New York, you will most likely find all of the local insurance information that you need here: Consumer Resources, Agents & Brokers, Companies, Applications & Licensing
No, you just have to get proactive. You can call your agent to see if you qualify for a lower rate or you can shop around for a new policy. In fact, car insurance rates fluctuate so often and so widely that, no matter how you feel about your policy, it's a good idea to at least window-shop every one to three years. You can also ask your insurer if you qualify for any discounts.

Source: Insure.com, from a study commissioned by Insure.com from Quadrant Information Services. Averages are based on a 40-year-old male driver who commutes 12 miles to work, with policy limits of 100/300/50 ($100,000 for injury liability for one person, $300,000 for all injuries and $50,000 for property damage in an accident) and a $500 deductible on collision and comprehensive insurance. The policy includes uninsured-motorist coverage. Rates were averaged across multiple ZIP codes and insurance companies. Average rates are for comparative purposes; your rate will depend on your personal factors.
Fayetteville is our #1 Most Expensive City in North Carolina, with an average annual cost of $977 when it comes to insuring an automobile - that's 21% more for our sample drivers than the typical NC city. Fayetteville is a fast-growing city with a population of over 203,000 residents, which makes it the sixth largest city in North Carolina. It was almost the capital of North Carolina (lost by one vote!), and was named after the Marquis de Lafayette when he visited in 1825. The Marquis toured the 24 state union in a carriage, which can be found in the Fayetteville Independent Light Infantry Amory & Museum. We suggest Fayetteville drivers save on auto insurance by looking into Auto Owners, Allied, North Carolina Farm Bureau, Erie, and Penn National. We found rates across these five companies to be $792 near you, which is 21% less than what drivers across Fayetteville usually pay. One thing to remember is that North Carolina Farm Bureau has a $25 membership fee but its low rates on auto insurance make joining worthwhile.

The Insurance Institute for Business and Home Safety: IBHS is an independent nonprofit scientific research and communications organization that provides real-world solutions for home and business owners with a mission to identify and promote the most efficient and effective ways to strengthen homes, businesses and communities against natural disasters and other causes of loss, and by that create a world with more durable and resilient communities
Collision and comprehensive only cover the market value of your car, not what you paid for it—and new cars depreciate quickly. If your car is totaled or stolen, there may be a “gap” between what you owe on the vehicle and your insurance coverage. To cover this, you may want to look into purchasing gap insurance to pay the difference. Note that for leased vehicles, gap coverage is usually rolled into your lease payments.
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