Many companies advertise free auto insurance quotes. Any car insurance quote you receive is and should be completely free. Insurance companies want to incentivize you to purchase a car insurance policy from them, so they’re not going to charge you for an upfront assessment (the quote). When shopping around for insurance, remember you can find free car insurance quotes from a variety of sources.


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Every auto insurance company advertises its low rates. But as with any product, the cheapest car insurance policy isn't always the best option. Considering the financial stakes, it's worth doing the due diligence to find a policy that protects your car completely in the event of a collision. Hunt for a great value, instead of settling for the cheapest car insurance in your state.


Ehhhh ... I mean, you won't face a legal penalty. (They vary by state, but usually involve hefty fines. Plus, your license could get suspended.) In terms of adequate coverage, it depends on where you live. Some states have low minimums. In fact, many only require liability insurance, which covers property damage or bodily injury you cause other people. You would need other types of car insurance if you wanted coverage for damage to your car.
It’s simple: If you drive a car, you need car insurance. Almost every state in the U.S. requires that drivers have at least basic liability coverage. You should also consider additional coverages, such as uninsured motorist coverage, collision coverage, personal injury protection and comprehensive car insurance to make sure you’re always prepared for the unexpected.
The above is meant as general information and as general policy descriptions to help you understand the different types of coverages. These descriptions do not refer to any specific contract of insurance and they do not modify any definitions, exclusions or any other provision expressly stated in any contracts of insurance. We encourage you to speak to your insurance representative and to read your policy contract to fully understand your coverages.
If your renewal doesn’t contain the correct information, you have to get in touch with your insurer. You have to make sure that all your information is updated and accurate and if you don’t take action to inform your insurer about any changes to your circumstances that you are fully aware are relevant to your policy, you might end up with a reduced payout on a claim or no payout at all. Your policy might be canceled and if fraud is suspected, the insurance company may simply act as if the policy had never existed.
Car insurance is required in every state (and Washington DC) with three exceptions: New Hampshire, Missouri (uninsured drivers must submit “proof of financial responsibility” to the Department of Revenue), and Virginia (where drivers must pay a $500 fee to drive uninsured). These states still require at-fault drivers to pay for any bodily injury and property damage.
For the full list of insurers, see below, where they're ranked from most affordable to most expensive. Rates are based on the average of our two drivers, who haven't had any traffic violations or accidents in the past five years. Based on your experience as a driver, and the types and amounts of coverage you choose on your auto insurance policy among other factors, your quotes will differ.
Example (Comprehensive): You park your car outside during a major hailstorm, and it's totaled. If you have comprehensive, we'll pay out for the full value of your car (minus your deductible amount). Example (Collision): You back out of your garage, hit your basketball hoop, and cause $2,000 worth of damage to your vehicle. If you have collision, we'll then pay for your repairs (minus your deductible amount).
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