A good place to start is HealthCare.gov. This is the health insurance exchange created by the The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, and is a one-stop shop for private individual market health insurance plans (note that the exchange itself is run by the government, but the health plans for sale in the exchange are all private, from the health insurance companies with which you're already familiar). People in 39 states use HealthCare.gov to enroll in individual market plans. The other 11 states and the District of Columbia have state-run exchanges, and you'll be directed to their sites from HealthCare.gov when you select your state.
The changes to group health insurance in Texas incorporated with the Affordable Care Act opened up new avenues for offering added value to your employees, but the process can be confusing at best. But it doesn’t have to be a struggle to find small business health insurance in Texas. A Custom Health Plans specialist will analyze your specific company’s needs and find the best Texas small business health insurance plan on the market for you and your employees, ensuring your company saves money, and your employees are covered.
Apply for Texas health insurance coverage at eHealthInsurance. We offer thousands of health plans underwritten by more than 180 of the nation’s health insurance companies. Compare Texas health plans side by side, get health insurance quotes, apply online and find affordable health insurance today. You can read more about the Affordable Care Act in our Obamacare Resource Center.
There are premium subsidies available in the exchange, but you're not eligible for them if the plan offered by your employer is considered affordable and provides minimum value (this is true for your family members as well, if they have access to your employer-sponsored plan, even if the employer-sponsored plan is only affordable for the employee's portion of the coverage; this is known as the family glitch). Most employer-sponsored plans are affordable and do provide minimum value. So if you're shopping for an individual market plan instead, chances are high that you'll have to pay full price for it, without any subsidies.
Nearly a century later, private health insurance continues to dominate the U.S. health care landscape. Despite attempts by U.S. Presidents, including Harry S. Truman, John F. Kennedy and Bill Clinton, government-sponsored universal health care never materialized. And, although President Lyndon Johnson signed Medicare into law in the 1960s to provide a safety net for citizens over age 65, the majority of Americans under 65 continue to get their health care from private insurers.
These plans meet all the requirements of the health care law, including covering pre-existing conditions, providing free preventive care, and not capping annual benefits. If you have one of these plans, you won’t have to pay the fee that people without coverage must pay through the 2018 plan year. (Note: Starting with the 2019 plan year (for which you’ll file taxes in April 2020), the fee no longer applies.)
If the coverage available through your employer feels unaffordable, you can shop around online to see what's available. You may be able to find an individual market policy that will provide you with the coverage you need but is less expensive than the premium you pay at work. This is unlikely to be the case if your plan only covers yourself, since your employer is likely subsidizing a good chunk of the total premiums for the plan offered through your job. But some employer-sponsored plans require the employee to cover the full cost of adding family members, so it's possible that your family members could get a better deal with a separate policy.
As mentioned above, the majority of Americans who have insurance obtain it through employer-sponsored, or group health insurance plans. The coverage has numerous advantages – among them cost (including the government income tax exemption for health benefits), ease of enrollment, and a wide range of plan options. (In addition to a health insurance plan, employees may have the option to purchase insurance for dental, life, short- and long-term disability.) Read here for more details about group health insurance plans.
“Humana” is the brand name for plans, products and services provided by one or more of the subsidiaries and affiliate companies of Humana Inc. (“Humana Entities”). Plans, products, and services are solely and only provided by one or more Humana Entities specified on the plan, product, or service contract, not Humana Inc. Not all plans, products, and services are available in each state.

Blue Cross Blue Shield Association is an association of independent Blue Cross and Blue Shield companies. Blue Cross Blue Shield Association is not a health insurance company and does not sell health insurance. Blue Cross Blue Shield health insurance is provided by your local, independent Blue Cross and Blue Shield companies and is marketed through authorized State Farm agents. Neither State Farm Mutual Automobile Insurance Company nor any of its subsidiaries or affiliates are financially responsible for these products.
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